Alaska Statute of Limitations for Personal Injury Claims

Alaska Statute of Limitations for Personal Injury Claims

Written by tabasum22, In General, Published On
January 18, 2023
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Last modified on January 24th, 2023

Under Alaska laws, you could be eligible for financial compensation if injured due to someone else’s negligence. You want to note that filing a personal injury claim has deadlines. Any claim accepted before its deadline is known as the statute of limitations.

The statute of limitations for filing a personal injury lawsuit in Alaska depends on the type of case. These limitations protect both parties’ rights and ensure the timely resolution of legal disputes. This blog post explores these various statutes and how they apply to personal injury cases in Alaska.

What a Discovery Rule Means and the Limit on Personal Injury Claims

In Alaska, the statute of limitations for personal injury claims is two years from the date of the accident or injury. However, there is an exception to this rule known as the “discovery rule.” The discovery rule allows injured parties to file a claim within two years of the date they discovered or should have discovered their injury. This exception applies in cases where the injury is not immediately apparent, such as with latent injuries or illnesses.

There is no limit on the compensation you can recover in a personal injury lawsuit. However, you might only recover reasonably necessary damages to compensate you for your injuries. For example, past and future medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering, and other economic and non-economic damages.

Special Rules for Minors

There are a few special rules that apply to minors who have been injured in Alaska:

  1. The statute of limitations for personal injury claims is extended to four years if the injured person was under 18 at the time of the accident.
  2. If a minor does not have a parent or guardian who can bring a claim on their behalf, they could do so themselves if they are over 14.
  3. If an injured minor reaches the age of majority after their accident but before filing a personal injury claim, they will have one year from their 18th birthday to do so.

Types of Personal Injury Cases and their Statutes of Limitations

  • Product Liability

Product liability is the legal responsibility of a manufacturer or seller of a defective product to compensate an injured consumer. The Alaska statute of limitations for personal injury claims arising from defective products is two years from the date of the injury.

If a defective product has injured you, you may be entitled to compensation for your medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering. A statute of limitations personal injury lawyer in Alaska could help you understand your rights and pursue a claim against the responsible parties.

  • Medical Malpractice

Medical malpractice is any negligence by a healthcare professional that leads to injury or death. It can take many forms, from errors in diagnosis or treatment to more general issues like failure to obtain informed consent or provide adequate follow-up care.

In Alaska, the statute of limitations for medical malpractice is two years from the date of the injury or one year from the date the injury was discovered, whichever is later. If you believe you or a loved one has been a victim of medical malpractice, it’s important to consult with an experienced attorney.

There are some exceptions to the general rule, such as for injuries to minors, which have a longer statute of limitations. And in cases where fraud is involved, the clock may start from the date of discovery rather than the date of the injury.

  • Wrongful Death

If you have lost a loved one due to the negligence of another, you could file a wrongful death lawsuit. Alaska’s statute of limitations for wrongful death is two years from the date of death. This means you must file your lawsuit within two years of your loved one’s death or be barred from doing so. Your attorney can help you understand your legal rights and options and can ensure that your case is filed on time.

  • Intentional Tort

An intentional tort occurs when one person deliberately causes harm to another. In Alaska, the statute of limitations for an intentional tort is two years from the date of the injury. There are a few exceptions to this rule, however.

If the victim was a minor at the time of the injury, they have until their twentieth birthday to file a claim. If the victim was mentally incapacitated at the time of the injury, they have one year from the date they regain the capacity to file a claim. And if the victim died due to the injury, their estate has two years from the date of death to file a wrongful death lawsuit.

  • Vehicle Accident

Many different types of personal injury cases can arise from a vehicle accident. The most common type of personal injury case is a negligence claim. To prove negligence, you must show that the defendant owed you a duty of care, breached that duty and that the breach was the proximate cause of your injuries.

The statute of limitations for filing a negligence claim in Alaska is two years from the date of the accident. There are some exceptions to this rule, such as if the plaintiff was a minor at the time of the accident or if the defendant was convicted of a crime related to the accident.

Knowing when you must file a claim or pursue legal action is essential when dealing with personal injury matters in Alaska. If you have been injured due to negligence or any other cause and are considering filing a claim, contact an experienced attorney as soon as possible. This will ensure that your rights are properly protected and that all deadlines are met within the state’s statute of limitations.

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